Parents can make a huge difference to our local schools, if we let them!

Tes Macpherson's picture
 1
Parents are passionate about helping their children succeed and improving their local school, and also have a wealth of skills, experience and resources at their disposal. They may be able to volunteer time to help at fundraising events or simply come in and read with kids. They might have professional skills they could put to good use, by becoming a @codeclub volunteer, start a drama or dance class either for free or at heavily subsidised rates, or just do a career's talk. There are many ways working parents can get involved, even if they cannot help during school hours. The possibilities are endless.

Currently very few schools fully leverage the wide range of skills available, nor do many parents know of ways in which they can help. It requires some organisation and coordination to fit it all into everyday busy lives. The opportunities need to be really clearly spelled out, made transparent and accessible.

I'm on a mission to join up those dots to facilitate this partnership between schools and parents, to benefit our kids! I'd love to hear from local schools, PTAs or parents who want to get involved.

Tes Macpherson
http://www.ptasocial.com.
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Comments

Janet Downs's picture
Thu, 22/11/2012 - 10:02

Tes - you're correct in highlighting the importance of parental involvement in their child's education. The CBI's latest report, First Steps, agrees that parental involvement is essential. But this needn't be formal arrangements with schools although, as you say, these have untapped potential. The CBI report recommends that schools give advice about how parents can support their children's learning. Earlier this year the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) gave advice about how carers could help their children become good readers (being a good reader raised children's performance, OECD found):

http://www.localschoolsnetwork.org.uk/2012/01/what-can-carers-do-to-help...

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