A powerful warning of the consequences of not listening to children: the Erl-King may snatch them away!

Francis Gilbert's picture
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I was saddened to hear about the death of the baritone singer, Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, this week, surely the greatest interpreters of Schubert's songs there has ever been. My own favourite are his amazing performances of the Erl-King. Here's the translation from Wikipedia, which is worth reading:

 

GermanLiteral translationAdaptation
Wer reitet so spät durch Nacht und Wind?Es ist der Vater mit seinem Kind;Er hat den Knaben wohl in dem Arm,Er faßt ihn sicher, er hält ihn warm."Mein Sohn, was birgst du so bang dein Gesicht?" –"Siehst, Vater, du den Erlkönig nicht?Den Erlenkönig mit Kron und Schweif?" –"Mein Sohn, es ist ein Nebelstreif.""Du liebes Kind, komm, geh mit mir!Gar schöne Spiele spiel' ich mit dir;Manch' bunte Blumen sind an dem Strand,Meine Mutter hat manch gülden Gewand." –"Mein Vater, mein Vater, und hörest du nicht,Was Erlenkönig mir leise verspricht?" –"Sei ruhig, bleibe ruhig, mein Kind;In dürren Blättern säuselt der Wind." –"Willst, feiner Knabe, du mit mir gehen?Meine Töchter sollen dich warten schön;Meine Töchter führen den nächtlichen Reihn,Und wiegen und tanzen und singen dich ein." –"Mein Vater, mein Vater, und siehst du nicht dortErlkönigs Töchter am düstern Ort?" –"Mein Sohn, mein Sohn, ich seh es genau:Es scheinen die alten Weiden so grau. –""Ich liebe dich, mich reizt deine schöne Gestalt;Und bist du nicht willig, so brauch ich Gewalt." –"Mein Vater, mein Vater, jetzt faßt er mich an!Erlkönig hat mir ein Leids getan!" –Dem Vater grauset's, er reitet geschwind,Er hält in Armen das ächzende Kind,Erreicht den Hof mit Müh' und Not;In seinen Armen das Kind war tot.
Who rides, so late, through night and wind?It is the father with his child.He has the boy well in his armHe holds him safely, he keeps him warm."My son, why do you hide your face so anxiously?""Father, do you not see the Elfking?The Elfking with crown and tail?""My son, it's a wisp of fog.""You dear child, come, go with me!Very lovely games I'll play with you;Some colourful flowers are on the beach,My mother has some golden robes.""My father, my father, and don't you hearWhat the Elfking quietly promises me?""Be calm, stay calm, my child;The wind is rustling through withered leaves.""Do you want to come with me, pretty boy?My daughters shall wait on you finely;My daughters will lead the nightly dance,And rock and dance and sing you to sleep.""My father, my father, and don't you see thereThe Elfking's daughters in the gloomy place?""My son, my son, I see it clearly:There shimmer the old willows so grey.""I love you, your beautiful form entices me;And if you're not willing, then I will use force.""My father, my father, he's grabbing me now!The Elfking has done me some harm!"It horrifies the father; he swiftly rides on,He holds the moaning child in his arms,Reaches the farm with trouble and hardship;In his arms, the child was dead.
Who rides there so late through the night dark and drear?The father it is, with his infant so dear;He holdeth the boy tightly clasp'd in his arm,He holdeth him safely, he keepeth him warm."My son, wherefore seek'st thou thy face thus to hide?""Look, father, the Alder King is close by our side!Dost see not the Alder King, with crown and with tail?""My son, 'tis the mist rising over the plain.""Oh, come, thou dear infant! oh come thou with me!For many a game I will play there with thee;On my beach, lovely flowers their blossoms unfold,My mother shall grace thee with garments of gold.""My father, my father, and dost thou not hearThe words that the Alder King now breathes in mine ear?""Be calm, dearest child, thy fancy deceives;the wind is sighing through withering leaves.""Wilt go, then, dear infant, wilt go with me there?My daughters shall tend thee with sisterly careMy daughters by night on the dance floor you lead,They'll cradle and rock thee, and sing thee to sleep.""My father, my father, and dost thou not see,How the Alder King is showing his daughters to me?""My darling, my darling, I see it aright,'Tis the aged grey willows deceiving thy sight.""I love thee, I'm charm'd by thy beauty, dear boy!And if thou aren't willing, then force I'll employ.""My father, my father, he seizes me fast,For sorely the Alder King has hurt me at last."The father now gallops, with terror half wild,He holds in his arms the shuddering child;He reaches his farmstead with toil and dread, –The child in his arms lies motionless, dead.


 



 

Here's Diskau singing it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9cOXbQSEQ0M

The poem is about the consequences of not listening to children; they get distracted by the "Erl-Kings" of this world; the snake-oil merchants promising easy money, easy pleasure, a new life, a complete escape. The father in the poem never listens to his son crying out for help and the terrible cost of this is the child's death. It makes me think of all the children I encounter in school who tell me how much they hate exams and testing; I haven't really met more than a handful who enjoy it. As we know from the best systems in the world, like the Finnish ones, high-pressure, high-stakes exams DON'T WORK; they demoralise, they deceive and they demotivate. Our children are telling us this, and yet we, like the father in Goethe's great poem, are NOT listening. What is the consequence of this going to be?

 

 

This video illustrates a Diskau version of the song:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JuG7Y6wiPL8&feature=fvwrel

This video is the most professional for showing the story and poem in its original German version, but it is NOT the Schubert song:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wusVHokSa98&feature=fvwrel
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Comments

Janet Downs's picture
Sun, 20/05/2012 - 16:29

Thanks, Francis. The song sends shivers up the spine.

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