Converter academies ignore Gove’s edict to help weaker schools

Janet Downs's picture
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“Every school that becomes an academy - and these are the new academies that convert - has to be in a relationship with another school that it is committed to help,” said Mr Gove in his evidence to the Education Select Committee on 31 January 2012. He added that potential partnerships were discussed before the funding agreement stage and he “would be very interested in the details of the individual academies that are not living up to that.”

Mr Gove is going to be very busy dealing with converter academies which have not kept their promise – statistics published in the TES show that 97% of converter academies have not partnered other schools.

Dale Bassett, from the think-tank Reform, forecast in the same issue of the TES that trailblazing schools were already “networking and collaborating on an unprecedented scale”.

If there are such networks of schools, they are not likely to be converter academies. Perhaps they are to be found among the recalcitrant group of schools, particularly primaries, who prefer to stay with the support of their local authorities.

 
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Paul Reeve's picture
Sun, 04/03/2012 - 19:52

Perhaps he should read this, just highlighted by Dylan William on Twitter. "Leadership, teacher collaboration, strong family ties, good teaching, & orderly climate—need at least 3 for improvement"

http://tinyurl.com/7uksxcy

guest's picture
Mon, 05/03/2012 - 16:28

Converters don't have to partner weaker schools in their immediate localities. Furthermore, some aren't working with communities for extended learning, and heads are aspiring to Wilshaw's fame to the detriment of all else (outstanding is a generalisation that doesn't necessarily chime with pupil's wellbeing).

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